About Financing the Future

Californians have a rare opportunity this year to think deeply about what their tax dollars accomplish—and to build a revenue system that supports everything from their neighborhood schools and a dependable safety net to the roads and water systems they rely on each day.

In its Financing the Future series, CA Fwd seeks to broaden this year’s critical conversation about tax reform—and to emphasize the fiscal, governance, and policy implications of tax proposals moving toward the 2016 ballot.


Chapter 1: What about Prop 30?

The first chapter explores how one major source of existing revenue—Proposition 30’s temporary taxes, approved by voters in 2012 and phasing out beginning in 2016—is likely to perform in the years ahead. CA Fwd concludes that the measure’s heavy reliance on the volatile incomes of wealthy Californians will make it an unreliable source of long-term funding.

READ MORE ABOUT CHAPTER 1:

CA Fwd report: Financing California’s future means thinking beyond Prop 30

Part 1 of new report previews needed conversation about long-term, equitable revenue system Read more


Chapter 2: Where California needs to invest—and how to pay for it

The second chapter encourages California leaders to pause before turning to specific revenue ideas—and to first consider the problems these dollars are trying to solve, identify funding gaps, and target public investments where they are most needed. A range of options is provided for how this could be done, with the report identifying a set of revenue sources in and out the state budget that could support two areas essential to the state’s long-term prosperity: California’s human capital and its aging infrastructure.

READ MORE ABOUT CHAPTER 2:

CA Fwd report highlights revenue options for investments in education and infrastructure

California's long-term prosperity depends on having this conversation about paying for state's top priorities regionally and statewide. Read more


Chapter 3: From revenue to results: Considering today’s tax proposals

The third chapter applies a similar approach to this year’s emerging policy proposals. It offers a set of criteria for assessing and comparing existing revenue proposals, including how they meet a set of generally accepted principles of taxation—and how well they support a range of state policy objectives.

READ MORE ABOUT CHAPTER 3:

CA Fwd report: The coming revenue debate must look beyond politics

With more than a dozen major tax proposals moving ahead, the new report from CA Fwd explores the biggest ideas and their policy implications, while outlining a set of criteria voters can use to weigh the merits of each. Read more

Financing The Future